Georgian Era Music

Georgian Era Music: The music enjoyed by the English Society during the Georgian Era did not discriminate according to the class the person belonged to. Everyone, especially the women were encouraged to learn to play musical instruments and even sing.

While women were encouraged to sing at home, gentlemen who could sing formed singing gross and performed at taverns and men’s clubs. If they could not play or sing, they were encouraged to enjoy music and be patrons of many musical societies. The latter was for the nobility who could afford to be patrons.

Georgian Era Music

In houses, the family members gathered together in the evenings with someone playing a popular song and maybe even singing it while others were preoccupied with their work. If there were a lot of people, there was also dancing involved.

Music sheets were expensive during this time and hence people would loan music sheets to each other. Poor musicians used to walk up and down streets, showcasing their talent in hopes to get recognized and paid.

Georgian Era Music

The themes of the music during this time was very different compared to the topics of the polite conversations. The music spoke about love, sexual pursuits and even declaring love openly which was frowned upon during normal conversation.

Like this, many young girls sang songs about questionable topics and no one thought chastened her because it was not wrong to sing about these topics.

Some Famous Music

Some famous music during this time was by William Campbell who published a series of Campbell’s Country Dances and Reels. Andrews and Birchall  published Five Favourite Dances

In the 1790s, orchestras became very popular and many patronized this form of music. There were performances at theatres which were attended by the nobility and the aristocracy as well as performances at taverns which included everyone in the society.

More Info On- Georgian Literature, Life of Georgian Era Women

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