Leonard Ravenhill (1867-1942) Biography

Introduction to works of Leonard Ravenhill

Leonard Ravenhill (1867-1942) Biography
Leonard Ravenhill (1867-1942) Works

Leonard Raven-Hill was born in Bath, in 1867. He the son of a stationer, and underwent education at the Bristol Grammar School, with the Devon County school. Leonard underwent the study of art at the Lambeth School of Art, later moving to Paris and receiving education of art under the tutelage of painters and artists like Bouguereau and Aime Morot.

He exhibited his works of art at many renowned and recognized institutes and galleries, one of such being the Royal Academy. He later transferred to artistic creations pertaining to pen and paper, becoming a co-founder, and joint-editor of “Butterfly” an art periodical, in the year 1893, in 1895, he began contributing to “Punch”, and joined its staff in 1901.

There, he followed Linley Sambourne for the post of junior political cartoonist under the tutelage Bernard Partridge.

Leonard Ravenhill’s Voyage to India

He also voyaged to India in the year 1902, capturing iconic moments therein. In India, he traveled widely throughout, interacting with the British troops and military presence.

It was evident from analyzing his later sketches that there was another purpose of his visit to India, to witness the Delhi Durbar which occurred on New Year’s Day of the year 1903, wherein Edward VII underwent accession to his throne, as the Emperor of India.

He was of an Imperialist philosophy, i.e. increase a country’s strength by colonization and employment of military force. His philosophy was illuminated by his sketches of the ruined Residency in Lucknow.

He found many aspects and traits of Indian life fascinating and was curious to know more. His credits, apart from the glamour, were also vested in the natives/common people. He depicted them with and affectionate humor. He responded to humanity and the life of the people, as that sparked curiosity within him.

In “Going to the Festival, Jaipur,” he depicted the same. And the same was done in his works as an illustrator, for ‘Kim for a place ‘Kim’ falling on his route from Bombay to Delhi.

Other Works of Leonard Ravenhill 

His other works include:

“Shall I smile?”, A Blank Day, Useful Information, A Little Knowledge, &c,”, Thames Tragedies, A Crisis, I’m sorry to hear you’ve been ailing John, Leopards and spots, No sentiment, Men and Women, Travel, Logic, Fickle Fortune, Logical, etc.

His cartoons about India include:

Goodbye to England (setting sail for India), Ayah and Chaprassi, The mild Hindoo sightseeing, Muhammad Kahn Killadan (Holder of the Fort), Delhi, Lord Kitchener’s baggage comes aboard, The Cashmere Giant 7 ft 9 in, Delhi, Travel to the Durbar, and in Delhi, Going to the Festival, Jaipur, The Official Photographer of the Durbar, Kim, The Indian Mail Memories of the Mutiny.

Leonard Raven-Hill passed away on 31st of March, in the year 1942, at Ryde, Isle of Wight.

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